Loving God = Loving Others

Dear Lord, Thank You for first loving me. For demonstrating Your love for me by Christ dying for me even when I was opposed to Him and a slave to sin. I want to love You with all that I am… heart, soul, and might.  Help me to speak Your love language: obedience. Help me to demonstrate my love for You by loving others.  It is not burdensome to love others because I do it out of love for You in Your name amen.

Biblegateway.com's Verse of the Day Feb. 2, 2015
Biblegateway.com’s Verse of the Day Feb. 2, 2015

 

THE TRINITY:

From David Guzik at Blueletterbible.org:

The Hebrew word for one is echad, which speaks most literally of a compound unity, instead of using the Hebrew word yacheed, which speaks of an absolute unity or singularity (Genesis 22:2 and Psalm 25:16).

The very first use of echad in the Bible is in Genesis 1:5: So the evening and the morning were the first day. Even here, we see a unity (one day) with the idea of plurality (made up of evening and morning). Genesis 2:24 uses echad in saying the two shall become one flesh. Again, the idea of a unity (one flesh), making a plurality (the two). In Exodus 26:6 and 11, the fifty gold clasps are used to hold the curtains together so the tent would be one(echad) – a unity (one) made up of a plurality (the many parts of the tabernacle). In Ezekiel 37:17 the LORD tells Ezekiel to join together two sticks (prophetically representing Ephraim and Judah) into one (echad), speaking again of a unity (one stick) made up of a plurality (the two sticks). There is no way that echad has the exclusive idea of an absolute singularity; the idea of One God in Three Persons fits just fine with the term echad.

The LORD our God: In addition, even the name of God in this line suggests the plurality of God. The Hebrew word is Elohim and grammatically, it is a plural word used as if it were singular – the verbs and pronouns used with it are generally in the plural.

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